Category Archives: Throwing Injuries

The Shoulder and Elbow in the Young Athlete

Introduction Shoulder and elbow injuries are, unfortunately, common in young athletes. In part this is due to the repetitive nature of many overhand sports, such as baseball, tennis and swimming which subjet the shoulder and elbow to repetitive loads over extended periods of time. Athletes who play these sports often develop chronic overuse type injuries.… Read More »


AC Joint in Baseball Players

Shoulder problems in pitchers are usually related to the rotator cuff muscles or the labrum. These are soft tissue structures that help stabilize the shoulder during the throwing motion. For Mariano Rivera, the shoulder pain that he had a few seasons before his retirement was related to his acromioclavicular joint (or AC joint). The AC… Read More »


Rotator Cuff Tears in Pitchers

The rotator cuff consists of four muscles that act together to stabilize and move the shoulder joint. Due to the function of these muscles, sports which require demanding overhead activities, such as tennis, baseball, or swimming, put the rotator cuff muscles under an undue amount of stress. A rotator cuff tear indicates a defect in… Read More »


Dead Arm Syndrome

Pain during the throwing motion that results in decreased velocity is commonly referred to as “Dead Arm Syndrome.” It can be related to any of the bones or soft tissues in the shoulder joint, but it usually involves the rotator cuff tendons or the labrum. The rotator cuff is a group of 4 muscles but… Read More »


Dr. Dines Publishes Textbook on Sports Medicine of Baseball

Josh Dines, along with Drs. Andrews, Yocum, Altchek and ElAttrache, just finished editing a textbook, Sports Medicine of Baseball. The book was published by Lippincott, and its target audience includes Orthopedic Surgeons, Physical Therapists, Athletic trainers and anyone else involved in the care of athletes who play baseball. In addition to editing the text, Josh… Read More »


Phil Hughes on DL with “Dead Arm”

Pain during the throwing motion that results in decreased velocity is commonly referred to as “Dead Arm Syndrome.” It can be related to any of the bones or soft tissues in the shoulder joint, but it usually involves the rotator cuff tendons or the labrum. The rotator cuff is a group of 4 muscles but… Read More »